Seasons and Weather


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Developed by: Tribal Nova


Overview

Ages 3-6

This interactive app promotes vocabulary development and learning of basic weather concepts. We love how children can learn about the science of weather through age-appropriate pictures, basic touch navigation, and simple audio prompting.

This app has three ways to interact with weather concepts: 1) select the appropriate weather photo, 2) identify proper clothing, and 3) match the activity with the weather.  Support your child’s interaction with this app in the beginning by talking about the prompts/question and reinforcing the ways to seek help (such as, where to press to hear a clue again).


Get Ready

As you introduce this app for the first time consider the following:

  1. Asking your child about the current weather. What do they notice about the temperature? What do they see in the sky? How are they dressed that particular day?
  2. Talk about your favorite kind of weather with your child.  Ask them to describe their favorite weather and explain why they feel this way.

Dive In

As your child interacts with this app, ask them why they are making certain choices.  For example, why did you select this photo?  What made you think ____ was a good choice?

Discuss new vocabulary heard in the app, such as: 

  1. names of the seasons (winter, summer, etc.)
  2. calendar
  3. camera
  4. picture
  5. photo album

 


Branch Out

  1. Ask your child to draw a picture of their favorite weather.  Make this into a sensory activity by using household products to create a 3-D image.  Cotton balls (clouds), yarn (grass), and tissue paper (blue for water) can really make a simple picture into a creative (and expressive) art project!
  2. Make a list of weather words! For younger children, write the word on one side of an index card and ask the child to draw a simple picture on the other side (for example, cloud). For older children, ask them to write the word independently or scaffold by shadow writing (have the adult write in yellow marker and the child trace in pencil) in addition to drawing the picture.
 
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