Our 4 September Children’s Books Picks

Each month at Zoobean, we select four loved books for kids ages 0-10.  Our featured book subscribers receive a copy of these books, along with a unique accompanying reading guide.  Of course, there are so many amazing books, and it’s hard to choose!  Luckily, we also have tons of personalized subscribers, so we’re able to meet individual kids’ preferences with a wide variety of books.  

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Take a look at our 4 featured books for September, along with our curators’ explanations for why they love each book!

Please, Puppy, Please! by Tonya Lewis Lee, Spike Lee, and Kadir Nelson

Why We Love This Book: Don’t get me wrong, I love a good concept book, and you’ll find plenty of those here on Zoobean. But what I’ve found as a parent of a young child is that ABC books can only take my son so far. What really gets him revved up about reading is story. Even when he was really little, there was a marked difference in his reaction to any book with a good narrative - and that reaction, as most parents know, is “More!”

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Why We Love This Book: Todd Parr has long been a favorite for our family.  When we first started reading children’s books with our own kids, it was our son who helped us find Parr’s fun and colorful books.  Cashew (kiddo) toddled over from the board books, drawn by the magnetic force of Parr’s bright characters and bold statements.  We read every one of his books over and over again, but it was It’s Okay To Be Different that resonated the most.  I’m pretty sure that it’s because of the “It’s okay to eat macaroni and cheese in the bathtub” scene.  We actually went ahead and did let the kids eat mac and cheese in the bathtub once, as a special treat! 

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Waiting for the Biblioburro, by Monica Brown and John Parra

Why We Love This Book: My dad’s earliest memory is going to the rice can and tapping it to find out whether there would be food to eat that day. I don’t know what my children’s earliest memories are going to be, but nothing like that. Nevertheless, I think it’s important that they understand that not everyone has the bountiful access to resources that they do.

As I’ve been curating children’s picture books, I’ve been surprised, saddened and yet pleased at the number of books that address the less shiny sides of life and do it in a way that is still full of hope, fun, and even wonder.

Science Verse, by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith

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Science Verse is a one-of-a-kind, laugh-out-loud, wow-this-author-is-so-clever! type of book.  It takes you on a lyrical journey of a boy who is “cursed” by hearing the poetry of science in everything…

As a mom, I love this book because it speaks to kids’ innate, science-based curiosities.  As a teacher, I love this book for its accessibility and seamless connection of science and language arts. 

Early on, we stumbled on to Please, Puppy, Please, and I knew right off we had a winner.  Read more…

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